Career Opportunities

If you are interested in a people-oriented, helping profession, then speech-language pathology or audiology may be the choice for you.  A speech-language pathologist works with the whole realm of human communication and its disorders.  He/she may evaluate, diagnose, and treat speech, language, cognitive-communication, and swallowing disorders.

According to The American Speech-Language and Hearing Association (ASHA), nationally, a speech-language pathologist may make from $51,000-$75,000 dollars a year. An audiologist will evaluate and treat hearing and hearing loss and work to improve communication disorders that result from hearing loss.  An audiologist may make from  $59,000-$76,000 dollars a year. For more information, click on the following links:

Speech Language PathologyAudiologyEmployment Rate: 100%

Speech Language Pathology

Work sites for a speech-language pathologist

  • Public and private schools
  • Hospitals
  • Rehabilitation centers
  • Short-term and long-term assisted living facilities
  • Community clinics
  • Colleges and universities
  • Private practice offices
  • State and local health departments
  • State and federal government agencies
  • Home health agencies
  • Adult day care centers
  • Centers for persons with developmental disabilities
  • Research laboratories

Future Outlooks for Speech-Language Pathology

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for speech-language pathologists is excepted to grow 11 percent from 2006 – 2016. The field is expected to expand as the baby-boomer generation reaches middle age and older. The survival rate of premature infants and trauma and stroke victims who need assessment and treatment is improving with the increases in medical advancements. As the population who needs the services of a speech-language pathologist increases, so will the demand for jobs.

Audiology

Work sites for an audiologist

  • Public and private schools
  • Hospitals
  • Rehabilitation centers
  • Residential health facilities
  • Community clinics
  • Colleges and universities
  • Private practice offices
  • State and local health departments
  • State and federal government agencies
  • Industry with hearing conservation programs
  • Long-term care facilities

Future Outlooks for Audiology

According to the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association, Audiology is expected to expand over the next eight years. Many states now require that all newborns be screened for hearing loss at birth. Medical advances are improving the survival rates of victims of neurological disorders, the elderly, and premature infants. Because hearing loss is associated with the aging population, the increase in the elderly population will mean an increase demand for audiologists. More and more hospitals, schools, and nursing care facilities are contracting with audiologist to provide services to their clients. This increase in need for audiologists will continue to grow in the future.

Employment Rate

Communication Science and Disorder Students enjoy a 100% employment rate after graduation.

Period Employment
in
Profession
%
2008 – 2009 20 100
2007 – 2008 18 100
2006 – 2007 20 100